The Weirdest Moons in the Solar System

The Weirdest Moons in the Solar System
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There are over 180 known moons in our Solar System, with more being discovered each year. Most of these moons are fairly ordinary lumps of rock, but some moons are very odd indeed!

Did you know that there’s a moon that looks like the Death Star from Star Wars? Or that one moon is stretched and squeezed by so much gravity that its surface moves up and down by 100 metres (over 300 feet)?

This new infographic reveals five of the strangest moons in the Solar System. Please feel free to share it, or use it for your blog, website or lesson plan! You’ll find embedding code after the infographic.

By the way: If you or your kids like space, you’re sure to enjoy my interactive space book for kids! It’s packed with tons of fascinating facts, interactive widgets, stunning photo galleries and gripping videos. Perfect for anyone aged 8+.

The Weirdest Moons in the Solar System: Iapetus, Io, Hyperion, Mimas, Miranda

(Click the infographic to view it at full size.)

Use this infographic on your site

Please feel free to embed this infographic on your blog or website! You can copy and paste the following markup:

Moon tweetables!

Here are some amazing moon facts you might like to tweet:

  • Jupiter’s moon Io has more volcanoes than any other planet or moon in the Solar System! » Tweet this «
  • Saturn has a moon that looks like the Death Star – and it was nearly blown apart. » Tweet this «
  • Uranus’s “Frankenstein moon” Miranda looks like bits of different moons stuck together! » Tweet this «
  • One of Saturn’s moons looks like a cross between a walnut and a tennis ball! » Tweet this «

Have fun learning about space!

I hope you enjoyed this infographic. Do you know of any other great space infographics? If so, please feel free to share them below. And don’t forget to check out my fact-packed space book for kids!

Creative Commons License

The Weirdest Moons in the Solar System by Matt Doyle is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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